Skin Cancer

  • Cancer Risk Working Night Shift | Alternative Cancer Remedies Blog
    Do you work the night shift?  There may be health issues associated with working overnight, including new evidence that it might be linked to certain types of cancer.
  • Firefighters’ Higher Skin Cancer | Natural Health Blog
    According to new research, firefighters are more likely than the general public to be diagnosed with skin cancer.
  • Moles That Lead To Cancer | Health Blog
    Most check their moles for changes that might signal the possibility of cancer, but new research suggests that we need to be much more conscious of any changes to the rest of our skin if we want to catch any developing melanomas at an early stage.
  • Types of Sunscreens | Natural Health Blog
    Many of the best-selling brands of sunscreen do not meet the standards of effectiveness set out by the American Academy of Dermatology.
  • Melanoma on the Soles of the Feet | Cancer Alternatives Health Blog
    Melanoma may develop on the soles of the feet due to stress and pressure rather than exposure to sunlight.
  • Exercise to Cut 13 Types of Cancer | Cancer Alternatives Health Blog
    Exercise may reduce the risk of 13 different forms of cancer.
  • Cancer Linked to Diet & Environment | Health Newsletter
    According to current thinking, there be no such thing as a single "cure for cancer." Fortunately, current thinking may not be entirely correct
  • Cancer Risk in Twins | Health Blog
    When an identical twin receives a cancer diagnosis, it somewhat raises the other twin's chance of developing not only that form of cancer, but any form at all of the disease.
  • Skin Cancer from Mobile Devices | Natural Health Blog
    The screens of mobile devices may reflect the ultraviolet rays of the sun and indirectly boost the user's exposure to potentially harmful wavelengths of light.
  • spray tan safety
    Research is now showing that spray tanning may be just as dangerous as every other form of tanning, but for different reasons. The problems stem from the active ingredient used in these tanning products, a chemical called dihydroxyacetone.
Subscribe to Skin Cancer