Natural Aphrodisiacs for Men and Women | Health Blog

Date: 11/09/2017    Written by: Hiyaguha Cohen

Beyond Viagra: Three Natural Aphrodisiacs for Men and Women

Natural Aphrodisiacs for Men and Women | Health Blog

The average adult on the street probably hasn’t a clue what the drug Losartin1 is used for, but few would be at a loss if you asked about Viagra. Since its release to the consumer market in 1998, Viagra has been the subject of much press, much conversation, and much controversy, as well as the butt of countless jokes (“What’s the difference between Niagara and Viagra? Niagara falls”). It’s also been a veritable goldmine for the pharmaceutical company Pfizer, which earned over $2 billion from the drug in 2012 alone.1

But while sales of the drug remain brisk, time has revealed that Viagra is far from the perfect “love drug.” For one thing, while it enhances and prolongs male erections, it does nothing to boost either male or female libido.2 In fact, it doesn’t help with any female sexual issues. Even more, the benefits of Viagra are counterbalanced by the potential for significant side effects, ranging from headaches and congestion to possible hearing loss, heart attack, acute glaucoma, melanoma spread, and a condition known as “priapism”—a painful, long-lasting erection that can send sufferers to the emergency room.3

The good news is that one doesn’t need a prescription to enhance sexual performance or desire. Here are three herbal solutions that you can try instead.

Damiana

Damiana comes from a bushy shrub with yellow aromatic flowers. It grows in dry, rocky, hilly parts of Mexico, Central America, and the US West including California and Texas.4 Damiana has a history of being used as an aphrodisiac dating back to the Mayan era, and in fact, research on rats has borne out the contention that Damiana does have the ability to improve sexual performance, allowing male rats to have several orgasms in short succession.56 While human experiments haven’t been conducted, there’s loads of anecdotal evidence suggesting that damiana is indeed the bomb, sexually speaking.  Nobody knows why, exactly, but it’s postulated that it enhances blood and oxygen flow to genital regions in both males and females. The result is increased libido and ability to achieve orgasm.

The wonder of damiana is that it offers other benefits as well, without the worrisome side effects typical of pharmaceuticals. It’s purported to promote an overall feeling of well-being, enhance mood, reduce anxiety, heal stomach ulcers and bladder infections, reduce asthma symptoms, and enhance digestion and suppress appetite, therefore leading to weight loss, especially when combined with other herbs such as guarana and yerba mate. Because of its overall usefulness for both sexual and overall health, Jon Barron uses it in both his Men’s Formula and Women’s Formula.

The only downside to damiana is that if taken in large doses, it can lower blood sugar levels, which can be a problem if you’re already taking diabetes medication, if you tend toward hypoglycemia, or if you’re headed for surgery. Otherwise, you can brew yourself damiana leaf tea, use it in a tincture, or even enjoy damiana tequila.

Maca

Maca is a vegetable in the broccoli family typically grown in mountainous areas of Peru. The root of the plant has a long history of use for myriad health applications, including as a sexual enhancer. If you happen to have access to the plant, you can use it much as you would potatoes: “boil em, mash em, stick em in a stew.” Otherwise, you can buy maca extract or powder, which you can bake into breads and cookies.

Studies have shown that maca does indeed increase sexual desire in both men and women.7 It also seems to enhance sperm production in men and regulate ovulation cycles in women, and therefore is known as a fertility enhancer.8 In fact, historians postulate that Incan farmers noticed that their animals bred more successfully when fed maca root, and so started taking it themselves to increase fertility. Today, maca is still a staple in the Peruvian diet.

Like damiana, maca also enhances overall well-being.9 Studies show it reduces symptoms of depression as well as anxiety. There’s evidence that it increases energy, reduces symptoms of menopause and PMS, regulates hormones, boosts the immune system, enhances memory, and acts as an anti-carcinogen. Plus, it’s loaded with vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and nutrients.

Fenugreek

If you love Indian food, you’ve no doubt enjoyed a recipe seasoned with Fenugreek. An annual herb, both the seeds and the leaves are used in cooking, as well as in some medicines. People have known the benefits of fenugreek for eons, and in fact, fenugreek was found in King Tut’s tomb.10
 
An Australian study conducted by the University of Queensland found that after six weeks of daily intake, 60 male subjects boosted libido by an average of 28 percent.11 The scientists attributed the effect to the saponins in fenugreek, which they believe stimulate the production of sex hormones, including testosterone. Apparently, fenugreek also aids men in stimulating and maintaining erections.

But fenugreek also works for women.12 In addition to having aphrodisiac effects, it is purported to increase female breast size, promote healthy breast tissue, and improve lactation because it contains phytoestrogens. The estrogenic properties also make it useful in reducing vaginal dryness and in controlling menopausal symptoms.

The benefits of fenugreek extend far beyond its ability to stimulate desire. Studies show that fenugreek works as an appetite suppressant, and also, reduces mucus production, cholesterol, and inflammation.13 It’s useful for treating gout, eczema, asthma, sore throat, respiratory problems hernia, and constipation. Plus, as Jon Barron explains, “fenugreek contains choline which has been shown to help aid the thinking process, slow mental aging, and also calm PMS and symptoms of menopause.” Also, it slows absorption of sugar into the bloodstream and aids in insulin production, making it helpful in controlling diabetes, which is why it’s an ingredient in Baseline Nutritional’s Glucotor V2.

Even if you have utterly no interest in lighting your fire, the trio of damiana, fenugreek, and maca have much to offer. And if you do want to spark your own passion, it couldn’t hurt to give these three a try before contributing to Pfizer’s bottom line.

 
  • 1. a. b. LOSARTAN is used to treat high blood pressure and to reduce the risk of stroke in certain patients. This drug also slows the progression of kidney disease in patients with diabetes.
  • 2. Gibson, Emma Alvarez. “Rev Up a Low Libido.” WebMD. 26 October 2017. https://www.webmd.com/men/features/revving-up-low-libido
  • 3. Nordqvist, Christian. “Viagra: Uses, side effects, and risks.” 7 September 2017. Medical News Today.26 October 2017. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/232912.php
  • 4. http://www.encyclopedia.com/places/africa/mauritius-and-runion-political-geography/damiana
  • 5. Seward, Marc. “The Top 6 Benefits of Damiana.” 29 October 2015. Healthy Focus. 26 October 2017. https://healthyfocus.org/the-top-5-benefits-of-damiana/
  • 6. https://www.zamnesia.com/content/368-the-history-of-damiana
  • 7. Kamal. “Maca.” Examine. 27 October 2017. https://examine.com/supplements/maca/
  • 8. “Maca for Fertility.” https://www.themacateam.com/maca-for-fertility
  • 9. “Top 5 Maca Root Benefits and Nutrition.” Dr. Axe. 27 October 2017. https://draxe.com/top-5-maca-root-benefits-and-nutrition/
  • 10. “9 Amazing Fenugreek Benefits.” https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/vegetable/fenugreek.html
  • 11. Kidd, Robert. “Fenugreek could be the spice of sex life.” Courier Mail. 27 October 2017. 20 June 2011. http://www.couriermail.com.au/ipad/fenugreek-could-be-spice-of-sex-life/news-story/ccee61c64d038661b198f3492b28c47c?sv=8f2b66e859154adad6940d8893cc464e
  • 12. Helf, Johann. “6 Natural Aphrodisiacs for Women.” Health. 27 October 2017. http://www.lifehack.org/articles/lifestyle/6-natural-aphrodisiacs-for-women.html
  • 13. Nayyar, Namita. “Fenugreek: A Spoonful of Aphrodisiac.” 31 August 2016. Women Fitness. 27 October 2017. https://www.womenfitness.net/fenugreek-aphrodisiac/
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